Gallery

Auschwitz

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The camp is surrounded by double-cordoned, formerly electrified barbed wire fencing. Now gone, one can easily imagine the tramping of SS boots, the shouts of guards, and barking of their attack dogs.

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This basement hallway and adjacent cells now stand dimly lit and deathly still; haunted by the memory of their former occupants, the starved and the tortured; inmates no longer visible, only remembered.

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There are many miles of this fencing still present, made of concrete posts and barbed wire, used in part to separate the camp into sections. This line of fencing is located behind the rail end in the direction of the Sauna.

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The camp is surrounded by double-cordoned, formerly electrified barbed wire fencing. Now gone, one can easily imagine the tramping of SS boots, the shouts of guards, and barking of their attack dogs.

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Located between Block 10 and 11, this wall and adjacent courtyard was an execution plaza where an estimated 20,000 inmates lost their lives. Most were shot from behind while standing naked.

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This is the main entrance to Birkenau as viewed from the unloading ramp. Through this entrance train transports from twenty three countries arrived, bringing millions to their death.

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These wooden-framed buildings, which at one time numbered hundreds and were originally designed as horse stables, each housed eight hundred or more inmates. Most of the barracks have been torn down, leaving behind a graveyard of foundations and chimneys.

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At each bunk level, six to eight people slept. The center brick and mortar duct was used for heating. "If the barrack walls were suddenly to fall away, many thousands of people, packed together, squeezed tightly in their bunks, would remain suspended in mid-air. Such a sight would be more gruesome than the medieval painting of the Last Judgment..." Tadeusz Borowski in the book "This Way for the Gas, Ladies and Gentlemen."

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Under the menacing watch of guards, five thousand to seven thousand or more inmates, many infected with typhus or dysentery, without any real opportunity to care for their personal hygiene, shared this latrine at any given time.

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This is the main entrance to Birkenau as viewed from the unloading ramp. Through this entrance train transports from twenty three countries arrived, bringing millions to their death.

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This is the unloading area, also known as the ramp, which begins just inside the main gate, continues for hundreds of yards, and ends adjacent to Crematories II and III. New arrivals, exhausted and confused, immediately went through a selection process. Those chosen for work went in one direction, the remainder, falsely told they were going to take disinfecting baths and have a warm meal, were moved in procession to the gas chambers.

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These wooden-framed buildings, which at one time numbered hundreds and were originally designed as horse stables, each housed eight hundred or more inmates. Most of the barracks have been torn down, leaving behind a graveyard of foundations and chimneys.

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This guard tower stands midway along the length of the unloading area. The gate leads to a road that separated camp sections BIIc and BIId. In the background are the ruins of BIId - the Men's Camp.

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At each bunk level, six to eight people slept. The center brick and mortar duct was used for heating. "If the barrack walls were suddenly to fall away, many thousands of people, packed together, squeezed tightly in their bunks, would remain suspended in mid-air. Such a sight would be more gruesome than the medieval painting of the Last Judgment..." Tadeusz Borowski in the book "This Way for the Gas, Ladies and Gentlemen."

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Crematories II and III were both built by inmates. Each building had three main parts; the underground undressing room and gas chamber, and the furnace room with ovens on the ground floor. The attic was used for drying the hair of gassed women, and as sleeping quarters for the Sonderkommando slave labor squads.

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